Posts Tagged by characters

GMingAdvice012

Today’s guest article is by Robert A. Neri Jr. of Ranger Games Publishing, and it’s not actually about bleeding onions — it’s about NPCs. Specifically, believable and engaging NPCs, a topic near and dear to every GM. Thanks, Robert! — Martin Non-player characters (NPCs) populate the game master’s fictional game worlds. NPCs provide a life source beside the vitality injected into the game by the player characters (PCs). Unlike PCs, however NPCs don’t need to be complete characters. Their level of completeness is directly related […]

GMingAdvice04

Today’s guest article was written by Gnome Stew reader Mark Kernow, and it tackles a nifty topic: taking existing rules for characters and stretching them to encompass entire groups. He uses d20 System games as a reference point, but the concept is easily extended to other systems. Thanks, Mark! — Martin What if you treated factions like characters? You could easily introduce new factions into your campaign by giving them statistics and backgrounds similar to characters and monsters. You could build on existing rules and […]

Start of the character themes section from the Neverwinter Campaign Setting. (Wizards of the Coast, 2011).

Depending on the experience level of the players gathered around your game table, one thing to keep in mind is that the array of class, race and faction choices available to them can be overwhelming — paralyzing, even.   Even in a standard fantasy game of elves, dwarves, humans and halflings playing wizards, fighters, clerics and thieves, new players will inevitably ask: “What’s the best choice?” It’s actually a hard question for GMs to answer. Mainly because the answer lies somewhere between the best choice […]

fishTankIntrigue_event

Today’s guest article by Gnome Stew reader Rickard Elimää is a follow-up to his previous piece on the Stew, The Fish Tank as a Mystery. Thanks, Rickard! Imagine the characters being fishes. Throw them into a fish tank filled with piranhas, lean back and watch what happens when they start swimming around. This article will show you how to create an open-ended intrigue in 20-40 minutes by following five steps. It will also talk about some of the theory behind it and finally how you […]

Storium_-_2014-09-05_12.13.41

So, a while back I was making a decent number of trips across country. In order to occupy myself during long, lonely hours in the car, I got into listening to RPG podcasts. On one of these Podcasts, I heard an interview with one of the people responsible for Storium.  Have you heard of Storium? I had heard about it in various people’s posts and knew there was a kickstarter going on for it, but I figured Storium was just a new storytelling game. It […]

GMingAdvice03

You’ve heard of “using the whole buffalo,” right? The idea that if you’re going to kill a buffalo, you should respect the buffalo by making every bit of it useful: eating the meat, tanning the hide, making stuff from its bones? When your players hand you their character sheets, think of each of those character sheets as a buffalo. Then, mix your analogies: Everything on your players’ character sheets is a flag. A what now? A flag, gaming-wise, is this (courtesy of our woefully out-of-date […]

GMingAdvice03

I’m not sure who started it (though my guess is the Stew’s own Don Mappin), but my group has a longstanding rule that has served us well for years: For the first adventure or two, or the first couple sessions (whatever’s appropriate to the current game), PCs can be reworked freely between sessions — you can change pretty much anything you like about your character. After that, they change and progress normally. This has become part of our social contract (or a cross-system universal house […]