Author: Matthew J. Neagley

About The Author

First introduced to RPGs through the DnD Red Box Set in 1990, Matt fights an ongoing battle with GMing ADD, leaving his to-do list littered with the broken wrecks of half-formed campaigns, worlds, characters, settings, and home-brewed systems. Luckily, his wife is also a GM, providing him with time on both sides of the screen.

3

Idle RPGs And Tabletop Game Time

I love me a good Idle RPG. For those of you not in the know, Idle games are games that more or less play themselves with minimal intervention from the player. Progress Quest, pictured above, is a silly fantasy RPG that, once you have made your character, plays more like an operating system installation than a game. All you do is check in every so often and see all the progress your character has made without you. Another of my favorites, Logging Quest 2 allows you to form a party, equip them, tweak their battle strategies, and send them...

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3

Three Horrible Reasons This Town Is So Clean*

Garbage. It’s ubiquitous. Some places are definitely cleaner than others, but there’s always a candy wrapper on the floor, coins under the couch, a discarded glove on the side of the road, and bulky items sitting next to instead of in the dumpster.** Except when there’s not. Here are three dark secrets where the first clue is remarkably clean surroundings. Who knew? Someone is picking up all that trash: Maybe it’s possessed dolls, maybe it’s sentient robots, maybe it’s a colony of eco-fanatics but someone is scouring the streets for trash at night and using it as raw materials...

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3

Three Unconventional Sages For Your Game

Knowledge can be a valuable commodity in RPGs. While sometimes PCs stumble on useful knowledge and want to unload what they know, more often the roles are reversed and they need to hunt down someone with specialized knowledge. While there are sages and experts aplenty in your average setting, here are three more unusual information brokers: The Loremaster Ravens A mortal cabal cursed with immortality and the form of ravens for trying to  outwit a trickster god into revealing his secrets, they now gather secrets of their own. The Loremasters have been around for ages so they know a...

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2

The Four* Encyclopedias of Daniel Cohen

When I was a youngster, one of my favorite books to borrow from my school library was “Monsters Giants and Little Men from Mars” by Daniel Cohen. It features an exposition of all sorts of cryptozoological topics such as the titular monsters (Loch Ness etc…) giants (the Cardiff giants**) and little men from mars (MIBs) plus many others. It’s written from a skeptical standpoint, but that fact went completely over my young monster-loving head (similarly it wasn’t until cartoon network reruns of Scooby-Doo that I would realize that the entire point of the show was that the monsters were never real***). When my daughter became a...

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10

An Olfactory Review of Adventure Scents

Adventure Scents provided us with samples of scent packets to review their Adventure Scents product. Angela Murray wrote up a review and took incredible images for those without video, while Matt Neagley, Darcy Ross, and John Arcadian took part in a reaction video.   Angela’s Review I’m a firm believer in the power certain smells can have to evoke memories and certain feelings, so I was definitely intrigued by the ideas behind Adventure Scents. Heck, I catch a whiff of a particular artificial peach smell and I’m instantly transported back to the age of 13 and riding my bike...

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4

A Rather Mysterious Experience

A few weeks after Christmas this year, I received an unexpected envelope. Inside was another, much older envelope and in that was a letter imploring me to tell no one of my receipt of that missive and to not discuss it’s contents. I immediately started carefully asking around to see who had sent it but no one had a clue. After more of this odd correspondence, including news clippings, postcards, other oddities (and eventually a wooden crate!), I was given the identity of my strange pen pal: The Mysterious Package Company. Normally I would outline what I received including...

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7

Three Explanations for Gygaxian Unnaturalism

Once upon a time Gygaxian Unnaturalism was the default assumption for DnD. In it, the world essentially plays favorites between PCs and monsters (unfortunately, the favorites are not you) and logic is more or less thrown out the window as far as stocking dungeons. Monsters rarely fight among themselves and will instead team up in odd combinations to fight you, doors refuse to open for you but swing easily for them, rooms are randomly arranged and dressed. In short, the dungeon is a bizarre place more the testing ground of a mad wizard than a realistic ecology simulator. In...

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7

The Impact of Re-Roll Keep Highest HPs in 0e

Gnome in Chief keeps his own independent blog over at www.martinralya.com and of course it’s on our slack feed. He often writes about all things OSR and recently wrote an article about the various ways one could roll for hps in 0e. To sum up, there were four methods discussed: Official method 1: roll a d6 and add it to your hps each level Official method 2: re-roll all your hit dice when you leveled up and kept the new roll (if it was lower than your old total, sucked to be you) Method from Empire of the Petal Throne:...

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5

Gming Easy Mode: Ocean Explorers!

My GMing roots lie in the big exploration campaigns of earlier editions, as opposed to the modern dungeon of the week with level appropriate crafted adventures. But these campaigns require a lot of front loaded prep and I’m simply bad at it. I don’t have the stamina to sit down for marathon prep sessions like I once did, and the thought of starting prep at all generally finds me dragging my feet and doing almost anything else. I’ve tried doing broad strokes for the big picture then doing detail work only on the immediately relevant areas, but even that...

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6

The Mini Dungeon as a Random Encounter

One of the problems in an exploration game is content. We’d all like to put together a campaign world with content jam packed into every nook and cranny, but there are some problems with that. First and foremost is our time constraints. Not only would it take forever to create so much content, but a lot of that effort would be wasted as entire swaths of our setting never got explored closely enough to dig out most of the material. Here is one potential solution to this issue: the mini dungeon as a random encounter. The concept is simple....

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5

Garage Sale 2016 Everything Must Go!

It’s time for my yearly garage sale article. Once again, it contains a set of items that your characters might find at a garage sale (or as loot or that might be brought to them by someone else who finds it) each with an adventure hook inside. Presented below are three items each with a mundane, magic and high tech version. A vintage vacuum: This is a solid vintage vacuum in good condition. It’s a bargain and could be used or sold to a collector who knows it’s true value. The vacuum is unexpectedly heavy. Its bag is bulging...

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11

The Fallacy of the Clean Dungeon Sweep

A common behavior (at least at every table I’ve ever been part of) is the clean dungeon sweep: making sure that every nook and cranny of a dungeon has been explored, every enemy fought and every goblin slain. Players often do this because they don’t want to miss any treasure or experience. In an idealized world, this turns out to be an inefficient strategy that actually slows players down. In practice there are external considerations that the GM controls. To see this, we need to simplify things a bit and imagine an entire campaign as a single dungeon that...

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6

Wait… Why Exactly Do We Use Hex Maps?

As usual, rather than actually prep, I find it much more useful and productive to agonize and fret over how exactly I should go about prepping until the desire to prep fades away. But at least this time I think I’ve actually gotten somewhere with it: namely I’ve decided on an alternative to overland mapping with a hex map. There are three main advantages to overland mapping with a hex map, as I see it: Easy to judge distance due to the built in scale Easy to judge density of points of interest, also due to the built in...

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2

Advantages of Limited Allies

I’m kicking around the concept of a little frontier town campaign in my head. In my mind one of the exciting parts of this style of game is exploration, and one of the fun old school exploration features is finding unexpected, and often uneasy allies in dangerous terrain. However, allies can be dangerous to a “taming the wilderness” style game because they provide pockets of safety and extra resources, and too much of either can derail the sense of unknown, danger, and isolation that are essential to the game. In light of this line of thinking, I’ve thought about...

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6

Character Exposition Through Play

I’ve recently been reading some books on how to improve my story writing, and one of the tips they invariably give is to not start your stories with a massive exposition dump. This is bad news for me because my writing is usually nothing but exposition dump, so I probably will never write the next bestseller to take the world by storm. That’s OK though, because it brought into focus one of the traditions of tabletop gaming that I’ve never really cared for. That is, of course, starting a campaign with every player going round and taking a massive...

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