Author: Troy E. Taylor


About Troy E. Taylor

Troy's happiest when up to his elbows in plaster molds and craft paint, creating terrain and detailing minis for his home game. A career journalist and Werecabbages freelancer, he also claims mastery of his kettle grill, from which he serves up pizza to his wife and three children.

GMingAdvice04

High drama. Suspense. Gritty Realism. All great tones to achieve when creating a campaign. Sometimes, though, the group needs a laugh. When delving a dungeon filled with the undead minions of the black-cloaked overlord has become a grind, or the horrors of the apocalyptic landscape hit too close to home — maybe a change of pace is called for. GMs should not be afraid to add some levity. Maybe it’s just a one-shot done with comedy in mind. Maybe it’s a short adventure arc featuring […]

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Need a monster to slay your party with in 2016? Try one of these five creatures, gleaned from sourcebooks in my gaming library.  These monsters are a whole different category of menace. They not only want to devour your crew of 10-foot pole-carrying adventurers, they have the means to be the predator in this ecology. Confronted with these terrors, PCs might think they are ready to fight, but they should always be prepared to flee. So, make sure your table’s PCs have their running shoes […]

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Back in April, on my personal Facebook page, I’d posted a photo of a diorama that I’d done years ago detailing the base town of our gaming group’s campaign, Steffenhold. Based on comments from that post, there’s been a request I do more on Steffenhold for Gnome Stew. Deciding what I should do, though, required some thought. What would GMs appreciate most? What I came up with is a new adventure — a campaign starter — focused on the three-spired structure across the Serene River […]

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As my home campaign of Tyranny of Dragons rolled into its closing chapter, I knew I was being presented with an opportunity that is pretty rare in rgp adventure storytelling. Namely, it was a chance to see how a massed battle of clashing armies might play out. Usually, the clashing of armies is background to the activities of the player characters. But this time, the two storylines were converging. In the storyline, the combined armies of good dragons and the Lord’s Alliance are taking on the […]

GMingAdvice04

The GM provides descriptions of every landscape and of every room. She gives voice to every monster and NPC. She adjudicates every turn in combat, and she lists every bit of loot and reveals every little clue along the way. It would seem, that from start to finish, the GM is doing a lot of talking. So, given the fact that, by definition, the GM is a conduit for a large amount of the game’s information, when is it important for the GM to just […]

Ryan Miller improv seminar

Regular readers familiar with my GMing style are aware that session prep is a strength. Now, such an approach still requires thinking on my feet, such as when the players turn left (when I anticipated that they would turn right), then I would still have an appropriate encounter or response at hand. Improvisation, however, is largely a foreign thing to me. The technique of GMing on the fly with little prep and a willingness to riff off the ideas of others at the table is as elusive as […]

GMingAdvice04

This one is for gamemasters learning to stock their first dungeons, a bit of straight-forward advice to make your life easier as you create and / or adapt adventures for your group. Make the room fit the monster. Now, this is more than just making sure that the dimensions of the encounter space match your adversary’s size. That’s just common sense. Dragons need a BIG room. Sprites less so (but room to fly around in is always advantageous). And with the exception of magical enhancements, […]